AR in the kitchen

In today’s fast tracking life people have less time, ability and energy to cook. In a fast pacing city person’s life an ideal situation would be getting as much as help to cook. It maybe difficult to believe but augmented reality can help us in cooking as well. There is need and there is technology available. Augmented reality can bridge this gap between consumer, product and product content. The ability to overlay additional information, visual stimulus and interaction on top of specific items give product companies the chance to combine the digital world with the physical one in a targeted and seamless way.

Helping to cook:

The seamless technology of order, delivery on time and AR enhanced glasses with instructions all exist; but not completely used altogether yet. However imagine, after you ordered ingredients for your dish, everything arrives on time. Your AR glasses is equipped with recipe you need to make the pot. You can see the description of the recipe and you can see the AR guidelines to cut, displaying on the vegetables. Basically you can easily cook with AR, even if you don’t have much experience. This could be for your daily cooking routine or learning how to cook.On the flip side, augmented reality allows training and execution by layering additional information on top of a users direct view.

Training the kitchen staff:

You can also use augmented reality displays to train your employees. AR can directly provide information and details in the kitchen. You wont need any books, pens  or paper.

Estimating portions:

The AR application ServAR can estimate portions. Accurate estimation of food portion size is a difficult task. Visual details are important clues of portion size and therefore technology-based aids may assist consumers when serving and estimating food portions.

Users of the system generally found the tool easy to use and agreed that it showed potential to support optimal portion size selection. However, some refinements to the tool are required to improve the user experience. ServAR demonstrates potential as a practical tool to guide the serving of food.

An interesting approach:

And finally, computer scientists from Kyoto Sangyo University in Japan have put together a demo kitchen that senses when you lay a fish down on the counter. The system is able to find the fish’s outline and orientation. Then ceiling-mounted projectors beam down a virtual cut line and knife while a speech bubble appears from the fish’s mouth, giving step-by-step instructions on how to filet it.

This setup also works for onions, but nothing else yet. The researchers must program each food preparation technique manually. Therefore, building up the system’s library is slow. The lead researcher Yu Suzuki stated, he and his colleagues plan to automate the instructions in the future.

As a conclusion:

As AR headsets begin to decrease in price and more developers work with AR/VR. It’s likely more and more companies will begin to trial and test these new learning platforms.

Visual enjoyment is a major part of any eating and drinking experience and brand names embrace virtual overlays as a way to educate, inspire, and prompt consumers to action.

Big brands are already repeatedly using AR outreach, but it still needs momentum from creators, developers and marketers to make it accessible for anyone and everyone.

Leave your Comment